Advent Calendar Paper Chain

An Advent Paper Chain provides a nice timeline for the Christmas holiday. Montessori used timelines to help children understand the concept time. Time has a present, past and future. Advent helps teach this in a fun and exciting way.

Instead of making an advent calendar,  printout paper chains for counting down the days for Christmas or any holiday. Use a small glue stick and scissors for hours of cutting, pasting and counting fun!

Older children can learn about ordinal numbers, such as 1st, 2nd, 3rd, etc. Use this printout to make your calendar chains for anytime of the year. It’s a great way to count down the days to your child’s birthday too.

Biomes for the Holidays

Everything can be a fun learning opportunity. The study of biomes can be applied to historical events. The main element that makes a biome unique-compared to an ecosystem or habitat- is its geographic location. The latitude and longitude of a
biome determine its ecosystem. Also altitude, geographic landforms, water, and weather patterns affect the life forms of a biome.

Here are some links about different types of biomes. Study the historic biomes of Hanukka or the Nativity. You can study any historic or religious event by researching the location and its ecosystem in context.

Here are some more links for ancient maps, customs, food, clothing, and animals of the Old Testament.

Holiday 3-part cards

Use last years Christmas, Hanukkah, or Kwanzza cards to make some nice holiday reading 3-part cards. I know I don’t want to send out last year’s cards, and I have at least 2 or 3 copies of each, which makes them perfect for Montessori reading cards.

Here are some examples you can use -print out 2 copies for each word you want to introduce. You can trim off any part of the card to make the exercise make more sense to your child.
Shepherds
Mary & Jesus
Nativity
Menorah

For older children, you can write more than one word label for the card. For example, write Mary and Jesus or a short sentence, ‘This is Mary and baby Jesus.” Older children can make a timeline of the holiday from the past to the present.