Montessori Penguin Nomenclature Cards

I love penguins! I can spend hours watching them at the local zoo. Here are some nomenclature cards to printout at

Polar Baby Animals Books

I found two charming, small books about baby polar animals. They are a great addition to your study of Polar Ice Biomes. Check them out at your local library.

They are as follows:

Baby Polar Bears by Aubrey Lang, photography by Wayne Lynch,  has beautiful photos and a short narrative about two young polar bear cubs in the Arctic. This book is rich with information and the photography is spectacular. It will keep your child’s attention with its exciting story of polar bear cubs.

Animal Babies in Polar Lands by Jennifer Schofield is a great book for younger students. Each section shows a picture of a polar baby with a description and an interactive question, “Who is my mommy?”  A picture of mom and baby are on the next page. What a fun guessing game!

Polar Books

Here are some books I think would make a nice addition to the Polar Biome Lessons:

Scholastic Polar Animals by Susan Hayes and Tory-Gordon Harris is well illustrated and easy to understand. It has a great overview of the Polar area and sections about the Arctic and Antarctic animals, plants and environment. It is a good book for younger readers with more illustrations than text.

Who Lives Here? Polar Animals by Deborah Hodge is an easy reader of 24 pages packed with fun facts and great illustrations about the polar regions’ animals.

Polar Worlds by Rosalyn Wade is for more advanced readers. It has details about both polar regions. The illustrations are excellent.  It has sections about animals in the both areas of the poles. Also,  it covers human activity in this frozen area.


Plankton to the Rescue

Phytoplankton, or microalgae,  usually blooms only once a year in the Arctic. Now it is blooming in the fall too. Phytoplankton is plant based and uses carbon dioxide in its photosynthesis. The Antarctic South Sea is also absorbing more carbon dioxide than previously thought.  According to NASA, carbon dioxide is a moving, long term force in climate change. This new information about the Polar regions absorbing more carbon dioxide brings a new element in the challenges of climate change.

Read out more at Live Science and Yahoo News